New recipes

Beyond the Margarita: 8 Tequila Cocktails

Beyond the Margarita: 8 Tequila Cocktails

There's more to agave than a margarita; spicy Cinco de Mayo cocktails

Let's be real, we are always down for a good margarita. Whether it's traditional, flavored, or frozen — we can't get enough of them. But why limit ourselves to only a margarita when tequila can be made into so, so many more cocktails? This Cinco de Mayo, we're thinking far beyond the margarita and wondering what other cocktails can be made with our favorite tequilas.

Click here for the 8 Tequila Cocktails Slideshow

Tequila lends itself to so many more cocktails that are just a step up from the margarita, so if you've mastered the art of the margarita, read ahead. While some are classics, like the Paloma (and its variation, the pomegranate Paloma), others are twists on other classic cocktails. Take the Mexican Mojito — while some may not think tequila belongs in a mint-based cocktail, we beg to differ. And of course, many of the cocktails are spicy, just the way we like it. What kind of Cinco de Mayo would it be without some jalepeños, after all?

Get creative this Cinco de Mayo and think outside the margarita and tequila shot. We promise, you'll still have some great cocktails in you. Click ahead for our favorite tequila recipes.


Go Beyond The Margarita With These Refreshing Tequila Cocktails

National Tequila Day is an actual ‘holiday’. It is celebrated annually on the 24th of July. And it’s best enjoyed with a glass of your favorite agave spirit in hand, of course. Or maybe you’ll opt to craft it into its most popular cocktail arrangement. If you’re in Mexico, it won’t be the one you’re probably expecting.

South of the border, the margarita is hardly the number one way in which to imbibe tequila. It’s not even close. That title would belong to the paloma—an easy combination of 1 part native spirit to 2 parts grapefruit soda, with a splash of lime juice and a pinch of salt.

But if you want to take an even deeper dive into the famous flavors of Jalisco, consider some special insight shared by El Tequileño. This particular brand was founded in 1959 by legendary industry pioneer, Don Jorge Salles Cuervo. Yes—that Cuervo. Today it is overseen by third-generation master distiller Jorge Antion Salles. The portfolio of 100% agave-derived liquids includes the world’s only ‘Reposado Rare’ — a rich, amber-hued tequila that’s aged in a massive American oak pipon for just over six years. It yields hints of cinnamon spice and marzipan in alternating threads. A traditional reposado, by comparison, rests for less than 12 months.

As a family-owned operation, El Tequileño has maintained a special relationship with local businesses in the actual town of Tequila, Mexico. Including perhaps the region’s most legendary outpost: La Capilla. This tiny, nondescript cantina just outside the central square is the birthplace of one of the country’s most enduring cocktails: The Batanga. It was invented by the tavern’s iconic owner, Don Javier Delgado Corona, who passed away earlier this year in his late 90s.


Cinco de Mayo tequila drinks beyond margaritas: The Cocktail Hour

On Cinco de Mayo, you will find many revelers hoisting a margarita, the most popular tequila drink in the world. But it's not the most popular tequila drink in the spirit's home nation.

Mexicans prefer the tart punch of margarita's cousin, Paloma, a drink that dates to the ❐s and includes tequila (either blanco or reposado), a bit of lime and grapefruit soda. The big creative decision is whether to use a commercial grapefruit soda -- such as Squirt, Jarritos or Fresca -- or make your own by mixing fresh grapefruit juice (red for sweeter, white for tarter) with soda water. To round out the flavors, add a pinch of salt or a salted rim.

The Fireside, on Northwest 23rd Avenue, is serving a version of the Paloma called Flores de Jalisco that's spiced up with ginger liqueur and given a floral note from tequila infused with dried jasmine flowers -- "The perfect porch sipper for a spring day," says bartender Matt Talavera.

It's one of many alternatives you can consider as Cinco de Mayo arrives Thursday, ushering in a weekend of celebration for Mexican food and drinks, including the annual fiesta at Tom McCall Waterfront Park, which runs through Sunday.

For a festive margarita alternative, consider El Diablo, a drink that came to prominence in Trader Vic's 1946 bartender's guide. It's tequila (blanco or reposado), lime juice and creme de cassis (the blackcurrant liqueur that makes a kir royal) topped with refreshing ginger beer. RingSide Grill in Northeast Portland is whipping up a traditional version, and a good bartender anywhere should be able to make you one without much fuss.

As the above drinks prove, tequila plays very well with citrus. At Hale Pele, the renowned tiki bar in Northeast Portland, look for the happy hour cocktail the Yellow Boxer, puckered up with equal parts fresh orange and lime juice, plus silver tequila and lime cordial. The recipe, based on a drink from a tropical bar in Germany, is served in a Collins glass over crushed ice -- "A refreshing cooler perfect for any time of the year," says bartender Sierra Kirk.

For a simpler citrus quencher, you should be able to find the easy-to-make Tequila Sunrise -- orange juice with a splash of grenadine that tints the drinks with its namesake design -- pretty much everywhere. Even simpler? Many ditch the mixers and go for simple tequila shots, often aided with a squeeze of lime and a taste of salt. However, in Mexico, tequila shots typically come with a chaser of sangrita. Some recipes call for a mix of orange, lime, grenadine and chili powder, while others are tomato-based.

For those who want to enjoy their tequila like a fine whiskey, there's the Tequila Old Fashioned. Unlike other tequila cocktails, anejo (aged one to three years) or extra-anejo (aged more than three years) often play the star, aided by a bit of sugar, bitters and soda water. Meanwhile, Shake Bar in Chinatown also uses anejo tequila for its Cinco-friendly version of the Cosmopolitan, that favorite of "Sex and the City" fans.

If you enjoy a bitter note in your cocktails, many bars are playing around with Campari, Aperol and other amari. Coquine mixes Campari and vermouth with the double punch of reposado tequila and mezcal for El Caminero, its twist on a Boulevardier.

And after all that, if you're still in the mood for a margarita, you'll find plenty of traditional takes and twists. Some of our favorite Portland margaritas can be found at Nuestra Cocina, Xico, Por Que No and Cha Taqueria, which should all be packed for Cinco de Mayo. Stella Taco, on Northeast Alberta Street, has a particularly floral version on the menu.

"At Stella we use locally made Raft syrup and Bitter Housewife bitters to bring together the classic margarita and hibiscus flavors with the floral Pacific Northwest lavender," says owner Ian Atkins.


Beyond The Margarita: 10 Tequila Cocktail Recipes To Try

Salt, shoot, suck. Then grit your teeth and shake your head to clear out the fire burning in your throat. This tequila ritual is familiar to many college students, but if you haven't sipped the agave-based spirit since you were younger, it's time for a refresher course.

The liquor is experiencing a renaissance, and producers are crafting single-estate and vintage dated tequilas. These artisanal tequilas have little in common with the processed stuff that stung your throat back in the day.

By Mexican law tequila, which is made by distilling the fermented juices of the blue agave plant, must be 51 percent agave. But that means the other 49 percent can be artificial ickiness. "Called mixto, the cheap stuff contains lots of added sugar and even caramel coloring, which mass producers use in an effort to reproduce the complex flavors in aged tequila," says Ted Gibson, a bartender who heads up the new All Agave Project tequila tasting program at Rancho Valencia in California.

Any bottle worth drinking bears the label 100 percent agave. "Quality tequila is an unprocessed natural spirit with depth of flavor," Gibson says. The best producers focus on terroir, just like with fine wines. A particular tequila's flavor depends on the growing conditions, altitude and sunlight.

"Typically, an agave plant grown in the highlands (above 6,000 feet) is bigger and contains more stored sugar, and its tequila tends to have a floral essence," Gibson says. "Tequila from plants grown in the lowlands are often more vegetal and spicy."

Now, we could just take Gibson's word for it that tequila is a versatile spirit that you should be mixing into more than margaritas. But where's the fun in that? Find out for yourself with these 10 inventive recipes that he created. It's a lineup of cocktails that you can serve at a slew of occasions -- the perfect sip for a barbecue, a bacon-garnished beverage for brunch, a twist on an Old Fashioned that's just right for an after-dinner delicacy and more. Move over, margarita -- the tequila game just got a whole lot more interesting. Get ready for 10 surprising new ways to enjoy this spirit. Salud!


5 delicious tequila drinks -- that go beyond the margarita! -- you’ll want to pour yourself today

In case you hadn’t gotten the memo, Wednesday is Cinco de Mayo. It seems fitting to celebrate the “holiday” with a tequila drink, doesn’t it?

Before you shudder at the word “tequila,” know there are plenty of ways to drink it besides shooting it. And if we have one ultimate suggestion before you start pouring your drinks: Don’t just reach for the cheap stuff when you’re making your tequila purchase. If there’s anything that drinking tequila has taught us, it’s that those bottles can often lead to the day-after headaches (oh, and drinking too much of it factors in, too).

As much as we love margaritas, we just appreciate tequila in general, so we thought it would be fun to try some new tequila cocktails.

1. FIG’s Watermelon Mary

The weather is slowly starting to warm up, so naturally, we had to choose this cocktail. A lighter take on a Bloody Mary from FIG Restaurant in Santa Monica, California, this one is perfect for any summertime brunch (or before -- no one’s watching).


Beyond The Margarita: 10 Tequila Cocktails To Try

The liquor is experiencing a renaissance, and producers are crafting single-estate and vintage dated tequilas. These artisanal tequilas have little in common with the processed stuff that stung your throat back in the day.

By Mexican law tequila, which is made by distilling the fermented juices of the blue agave plant, must be 51 percent agave. But that means the other 49 percent can be artificial ickiness. "Called mixto, the cheap stuff contains lots of added sugar and even caramel coloring, which mass producers use in an effort to reproduce the complex flavors in aged tequila," says Ted Gibson, a bartender who heads up the new All Agave Project tequila tasting program at Rancho Valencia in California.

Not all tequila is alike

Any bottle worth drinking bears the label 100 percent agave. "Quality tequila is an unprocessed natural spirit with depth of flavor," Gibson says. The best producers focus on terroir, just like with fine wines. A particular tequila's flavor depends on the growing conditions, altitude and sunlight.

"Typically, an agave plant grown in the highlands (above 6,000 feet) is bigger and contains more stored sugar, and its tequila tends to have a floral essence," Gibson says. "Tequila from plants grown in the lowlands are often more vegetal and spicy."

Now, we could just take Gibson's word for it that tequila is a versatile spirit that you should be mixing into more than margaritas. But where's the fun in that? Find out for yourself with these 10 inventive recipes that he created. It's a lineup of cocktails that you can serve at a slew of occasions -- the perfect sip for a barbecue, a bacon-garnished beverage for brunch, a twist on an Old Fashioned that's just right for an after-dinner delicacy and more. Move over, margarita -- the tequila game just got a whole lot more interesting. Get ready for 10 surprising new ways to enjoy this spirit. Salud!

Gallagher's Smash

When we think of fruit and tequila, lemons and limes come to mind. But there are many other varieties that pair perfectly with the spirit.

Combine ingredients in mixing glass muddle. Add ice, then shake. Double strain over fresh ice and garnish with a watermelon cube and a sage leaf.

Raspberry Beret

Gibson's Raspberry Beret is a cinch for a party. The recipe below serves one, but it's easy to turn it into a big batch. Just make the raspberry-mint lemonade in advance (purée lemonade, raspberries and mint leaves, then strain), and add the booze once it's party time.

Combine ingredients in mixing glass gently muddle. Add ice, then shake. Double strain over fresh ice. Garnish with a raspberry and a sprig of fresh mint.

Juan-y Appleseed

"Herbs go well with blanco tequila, due to the spirit's vegetal and floral flavors," Gibson says. This recipe calls for licorice-scented tarragon, but mint, thyme, sage and cilantro all complement tequila.

1 1/2 ounces blanco tequila

1 ounce granny smith apple juice

Combine ingredients in mixing glass gently muddle. Add ice, then shake. Double strain over fresh ice and garnish with an apple slice and a sprig of tarragon.

Gibson's Raspberry Beret is a cinch for a party. The recipe below serves one, but it's easy to turn it into a big batch. Just make the raspberry-mint lemonade in advance (puree lemonade, raspberries and mint leaves, then strain), and add the booze once it's party time. Credit: Copyright 2015 Oscar E. Murden Jr.

The Pimm's Cup, a classic gin-based English cocktail, is Pimm's No. 1, cucumber and lemonade, lemon-lime soda or ginger ale. Mix things up by swapping the gin for tequila for a clean, refreshing beverage.

1 1/2 ounces blanco tequila

3 dashes Bitter Truth Celery Bitters

Combine ingredients in mixing glass gently muddle. Add ice, then shake. Double strain over fresh ice and garnish with a cucumber ribbon and a basil leaf.

"It's simple to make your own pepper-infused tequila," says Gibson, who admits that La Pinata is his favorite of the tequila creations he makes, because the cilantro and the heat are a match made in mixology heaven. Just slice one serrano in half lengthwise and drop it into a bottle of tequila. Let it sit for 24 hours, then taste.

2 ounces serrano-infused blanco tequila

1 ounce fresh pineapple juice

3 sprigs cilantro, leaves torn

Shake ingredients in mixing glass with ice. Double strain over fresh ice and garnish with pineapple leaves, a lime wheel and cilantro.


"Herbs go well with blanco tequila, due to the spirit's vegetal and floral flavors," says Gibson. This recipe calls for licorice-scented tarragon, but mint, thyme, sage and cilantro all complement tequila. Credit: Copyright 2015 Oscar E. Murden Jr.

A Paloma is a beloved cocktail made with tequila and grapefruit juice. Give it a modern twist by charring the grapefruit before you juice it so it caramelizes slightly (simply halve the grapefruit and toss it onto a hot grill until you see grill marks). For a garnish, a charred grapefruit slice adds visual interest and even more smoky flavor.

2 ounces reposado tequila

2 ounces charred grapefruit juice

1/2 ounce cinnamon simple syrup

1 charred grapefruit segment

Shake ingredients in mixing glass with ice. Double strain over fresh ice and garnish with charred grapefruit segment and cinnamon sticks.

The Palomino

Vanilla plays well with reposado tequila, bringing out its rich barrel-aged flavor.

For this recipe, it's simple to make your own vanilla bean syrup. Simply combine 1 cup each of sugar and water in a small saucepan, along with a vanilla bean (slice it down the middle and scrape the black seeds into the liquid mixture, along with the pod). Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for about 20 minutes or until the sugar has dissolved. If you don't feel like making your own syrup, substitute Licor 43, a Spanish liquor with hints of vanilla and citrus, for the syrup and lime juice called for in the recipe.

2 ounces reposado tequila

1/2 ounce vanilla bean syrup

Shake ingredients in mixing glass with ice. Strain over fresh ice and garnish with a lime wheel and candied ginger.

The Thyme Me is a fun alternative to a Bloody Mary, featuring classic breakfast flavors like maple syrup and bacon. Keep the garnish in place as you sip, so you get the aromatics from the bacon. Then, when you've finished your drink, it's snack time.

2 ounces reposado tequila

Combine ingredients in mixing glass gently muddle. Add ice, then shake. Double strain over fresh ice. Garnish with a strip of crispy bacon and a thyme sprig.

Loosen the Reins

This cocktail, deep and complex, is basically an Old Fashioned made with tequila instead of bourbon. It's perfect for after dinner -- like dessert in a glass, thanks to the addition of the chocolate bitters.

2 1/2 ounces anejo tequila

3 to 4 dashes Fee Brothers Aztec chocolate bitters

Combine ingredients in mixing glass. Add ice, then stir. Strain over fresh ice. Express orange peel over drink and around rim.

Tiny Bubbles

Who knew tequila and prosecco, champagne or cava would work so well together? Balanced, light and perfect for brunch, this cocktail shows that the spirit isn't all muscle and fire.

1/2 ounce grapefruit-infused St. Germain

4 to 5 seedless red grapes

Combine ingredients (except for sparkling wine) in mixing glass muddle. Add ice, then shake. Double strain over fresh ice, then top with sparkling wine. Garnish with a lemon peel and grapes.


Sol de Flare Cocktail

Sol de Flare Cocktail

At a fiesta, set up a drink display of Sol de Flare with top-shelf pepper-infused tequila, the perfect signature drink for a Cinco de Mayo party.

Blood orange juice and pepper-infused tequila create a drink that’s as pleasing to the eye as it is the taste buds.


Nine Tequila Cocktails Beyond the Margarita

Who can say no to a classic Margarita? But don’t think that tequila’s sole purpose is for this iconic cocktail. These cocktails use tequila as a primary or supporting spirit and will inspire you to get creative with your drinks, whether you are enjoying them at home or at a bar.

Learn how to make a sophisticated slushie, a fig/thyme/licorice cocktail, a riff on a classic tiki drink, a boozy take on cold-brew coffee, a drink best served with a blowtorch, a beer-topped riff on a Moscow mule, or a paloma-esque grapefruit refresher. And since we couldn’t resist, one new take on a traditional margarita that includes—yes—pickle brine. Click through to the end for a non-alcoholic shrub perfect for dry-drinking, or equally delicious spiked with a shot of tequila.

Click for the first recipe, and get mixing!

Looking to learn more about different types of tequila, how to use them and what bottles to buy? Here’s more information on each of the three main styles:

Blanco

Reposado

Añejo

Courtesy Andrew Olsen, bar manager, Bluestem, Kansas City, Missouri

At Bluestem, a James Beard Award-winning restaurant in Kansas City, Missouri, the cocktail program echoes the straightforward aesthetic of a kitchen that’s heralded for its New American fare.

“My goal is to not compromise the base flavor of the spirits we select,” says Bar Manager Andrew Olsen. “I want to showcase the flavors and make them really shine.”

Olsen built this cocktail around ­Tequila Ocho Plata, a producer that makes single-­estate, single-vintage Tequilas. (Although if you swap in your favorite blanco Tequila, we won’t tell.)

“Like coffee and wine, Tequila has a lot to do with terroir,” Olsen says.

The drink riffs on two classics, the Paloma, spiked with grapefruit and Tequila, and Italy’s refreshing, slushie-style Sgroppino. Sparkling wine helps aerate the drink, creating a light, almost fluffy texture. The end result: a frozen drink for grown-ups to savor.

*Bluestem makes its housemade grenadine from equal parts pomegranate juice and cane sugar, but you can substitute a quality commercial version like Small Hands Foods Grenadine Syrup—look for pomegranate in the list of ingredients.

  • 1 ounce Tequila Ocho Plata
  • 1 ounce Combier Pamplemousse Rose grapefruit liqueur
  • 1 ounce sparkling wine
  • ½ ounce grenadine
  • ½ ounce lime juice
  • Orange zest, for garnish

In a blender, combine all ingredients except garnish with 1 cup of ice. Blend for 30 seconds, and pour into a wine glass or brandy snifter. Garnish with orange zest.

Courtesy Alberto Battaglini, general manager/mixologist, S.Y.Kitchen, Santa Ynez, CA

Think of this cocktail as a fall-friendly margarita that incorporates the herbaceous freshness of blanco Tequila and draws in rich notes of fresh, in-season figs. It’s ideal to bridge the early autumnal days when it’s no longer frozen margarita weather, but also too mild to break out the Cognac and other darker, warming spirits.

When Figs Fly

Figs are in season twice a year. The first, or “breba” season, is during the first few weeks in June. The second, or “new wood” season, lasts longer, typically from August through October. The most common variety is the sweet Black Mission fig, followed by mild Brown Turkish and Green Kadota. The Kadota is nearly seedless, which makes it ideal for cocktails. Can’t find fresh figs? Add fig preserves, purée or jam into the cocktail shaker instead.

  • 2 fresh figs, cut in half
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 ounces blanco Tequila
  • 1 ounce fresh lime juice
  • ½ ounce agave syrup
  • 1 licorice root

In cocktail shaker, muddle 1½ figs and 1 sprig thyme with muddler or back of spoon. Add Tequila, lime, agave syrup and ice. Shake well, and strain into coupe glass. Grate fresh licorice root on top. Garnish with remaining fig half and thyme sprig.

Once considered an obscure tropical drink, the Jungle Bird has become one of the most popular on the tiki bar circuit. The original, made with dark rum, pineapple and Campari, was invented in 1978 at the Kuala Lumpur Hilton.

Tiki bars are all about dramatic, over-the-top drinks and presentation. At Chicago’s Lost Lake, perhaps today’s most-lauded tiki bar, the Jungle Bird adds a few more feathers to its exotic plumage. Tequila (with mezcal in a supporting role) replaces rum, ruby Port adds depth and glow, and passion fruit syrup ups the tropical fruit factor.

Although bartender Paul McGee usually presents his Surfing Bird in a huge bowl to serve six thirsty revelers, this drink is pared down to a single serving.

  • 1½ ounces reposado Tequila
  • ½ ounce mezcal
  • ¼ ounce Campari
  • ¼ ounce ruby Port
  • ¾ ounce fresh pineapple juice
  • ¾ ounce fresh lime juice
  • ½ ounce passion fruit syrup, like Monin
  • ¼ ounce simple syrup

Combine all ingredients and 1 cup of crushed ice in a blender. Blend for 3 seconds. (Or, add to a cocktail shaker, and shake well.) Pour into a tiki mug and top with 1 cup of crushed ice. Garnish tropically.

Scoop ice cubes into a sealable plastic bag. Squeeze out all the air and seal. Use a meat mallet or rolling pin to pound the ice into small pieces. Another option? Use a Lewis Bag, which bartenders use to gleefully thwack ice into bits.


How to Make Ranch Water

The beauty of ranch water is there&aposs no exact science to perfecting this drink, so feel free to adjust it to your taste preferences. If you want a spicier take, try the aleppo-pepper and salt rim featured in the batch recipe (serves 8!) on our sister site, MarthaStewart.com.

Ingredients

  • 1½ to 2 ounces of tequila
  • ½ ounce freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 4 ounces Topo Chico (You can use another sparkling mineral water brand here, but Texas natives will argue nothing else compares. Look for it in the sparkling water or Mexican section of your grocery store.)
  • Lime wedges, for garnish
  • Lots of ice

Fill a tall glass with ice cubes. Add your tequila and lime juice, then top it off with your Topo Chico. Sip away!


11 Tequila Cocktails That Go Beyond the Margarita

Tequila has a reputation as a party alcohol: It’s the one you reach for on vacation or for a weekend margarita. (And we love them, especially with a twist see our Cucumber Margarita recipe or our Watermelon Margarita recipe for just two tasty examples.) But these tequila cocktail recipes show the Mexican spirit in a different, and dare we say, more sophisticated light. Try them out and find your new go-to cocktail for entertaining…or just for a Thursday night at home.

1. Tequila Negroni

Spaghetti tacos aren’t the only Mexican-Italian fusion we’re into. We also like swapping out the usual gin for blanco tequila in a classic negroni cocktail once in a while. Get our Tequila Negroni recipe.

This clever cocktail incorporates avocados and thyme for a savory twist on your typical tequila drink, with a nice bit of body from the creamy fruit. Get our Copa Verde recipe.

3. Big Spender

Hey, big spender, we can’t get enough of you. This gorgeous bubbly cocktail gets its sparkle from Champagne (or Cava). The flavor profile might sound too complicated, but give it a chance. Unexpected spirits, like Clément Créole Shrubb liqueur (a spiced rum blend), mingle together to create a bold and bright drink. Get our Big Spender recipe.

4. Zapatos Nuevos

We aren’t entirely sure why this drink is called “new shoes” in Spanish, but you’ll be so busy sipping that you won’t even think about it. Basil, lime juice, and cubes of fresh watermelon make this one of the most refreshing tequila cocktails we’ve ever had. Ideal for summer and spring, it’s an easily batch-able drink to make for a crowd. Get our Zapatos Nuevos recipe.

5. Silk Stockings

Tequila isn’t just for cold summer drinks. Here, we shake it up with heavy cream and sweet crème de cacao. A dash of cinnamon and a touch of grenadine transform the drink into a festive winter indulgence that is high on our list for holiday parties. Not that you can’t enjoy it in summer too think of it as a lighter, boozier milkshake and it makes sense. Get our Silk Stockings recipe.

6. La Pinela

Spicy and sweet, this tequila cocktail gets its kick from Licor 43, a spiced Spanish liqueur with hints of vanilla. The sweetness is far from one note: Pineapple juice adds natural sugar and homemade cinnamon syrup layers on a little more. Make extra cinnamon syrup to use in fall cocktails and desserts we promise it won’t go to waste. Get our La Pinela recipe.

7. Mexican 75

France can keep their French 75 cocktails. Instead, discover a new twist on the classic drink. This recipe swaps gin for tequila and keeps the lime, simple syrup, and sparkling wine. It’s sweet, effervescent, and gets you tipsy. What’s not to like? Get our Mexican 75 recipe.

8. Tamarindo Borracho

Spice up your tequila with a hit of tamarind-chile syrup. This sweet infused simple syrup is the perfect way to showcase tamarind, a slightly sour fruit that is often found in Indian and Mexican cuisine. Tequila is an excellent foil for the bold flavor of the tamarind and the heat of the chile. Get our Tamarindo Borracho recipe.

9. Coupe de Ville

This kinda sorta counts as Grand Marnier-enhanced margarita, but it gets a fizzy lift from lager, and is great for big batches (whether you’re hosting a Cinco de Mayo party or watching a game with friends). Get our Coupe de Ville recipe.

10. Extra-Spicy Bloody Maria

Tequila can be for brunch too—try this spicy tequila twist on a Bloody Mary with your next breakfast burrito or plate of huevos rancheros. Get our Extra-Spicy Bloody Maria recipe.

11. Tequila Mockingbird

Since the name is a play on the famous book, we consider drinking this cocktail kind of like getting our (drinking) education. With just four ingredients, it’s easy to make but the addition of crème de menthe takes tequila in a new direction. Vividly green in color, it’s just the sort of interesting cocktail we like to serve at a party. Get our Tequila Mockingbird recipe.


Watch the video: Beyond The Margarita: Making Delicious Tequila Cocktails (January 2022).