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New Study Offers Possible Peanut Allergy Cure for Children

New Study Offers Possible Peanut Allergy Cure for Children


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Researchers discover a reduction in sensitivity among peanut-allergic children

A recent study may help provide new therapies for children suffering from peanut allergies.

This may come as a surprise, but for children suffering from peanut allergies, the solution may end up being peanuts.

A recent study published by The Lancet showed that in limited trials where children with peanut allergies were introduced to the allergen in small dosages, over time those children exhibited fewer symptoms of allergic reaction.

The trial, according to The Guardian, consisted of children between the ages of 7 and 16, who were given small dosages of powdered peanuts mixed into their meals. After six months, 84% of the children given the peanut mixture were able to tolerate ingesting the equivalent of five peanuts without an allergic reaction, while none of the children in the control group were.

“We have been very encouraged about the results of peanut oral immunotherapy studies over the last few years, including the most recent findings published in The Lancet,” said John L. Lehr, chief executive officer of Food Allergy Research & Education, which is funding oral immunotherapy studies here in the U.S. “We need to find treatments — and ultimately, a cure—that will prevent people with food allergies from experiencing life-threatening reactions, and we are optimistic about oral immunotherapy and other treatments currently under study. There is an urgent need for a cure, and we remain committed to investing in world-class research to identify it.”


Peanut Allergy: Possible Breakthrough

Recent scientific studies from Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford University offer a possible breakthrough in regard to patients who suffer from a peanut allergy. This research further substantiates the increasing amount of evidence regarding oral immunotherapy (OIT), which has been conducted at The University of Cambridge. According to these research practices, the slight introduction of the allergen to individuals with peanut allergies could possibly modify the way their DNA reacts to it, which offers a possible breakthrough if the theory is proven to be correct.

This type of oral immunotherapy would require patients who are allergic to peanuts to digest an infinitesimal amount of the allergen, and then increase the amount with due time. According to studies, this will desensitize those allergic from their peanut allergies. If this theory work, it could be a possible breakthrough, as the peanut allergy is the number one cause of allergic reactions in America, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. In addition, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology also notes that the peanut allergy affects over 400,000 children in America.

This suggested alteration of DNA is known to scientists as epigenetic change, which is derived from the Latin word epi meaning above. So, the meaning of the word means above genes in which a person is born. According to Dr. Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn who is a pediatrics professor at the Mount Sinai Hospital i New York, “this discovery has an immense positive value to it due to the fact that it enables individuals who are allergic to peanuts to build a tolerance in which they won’t have to worry about being exposed to the allergen accidentally. The professor went on to further elaborate with her statement, “It is very important that patients who are undergoing oral immunotherapy to continue being exposed to the allergen, as there is not a cure for the peanut allergy at this time.” With both these imperative factors keep into consideration, this study offers a possible breakthrough in regard to the peanut allergy.

This possible breakthrough in regard to the peanut allergy was the result of researchers examining the affects of 20 different individuals who were subject to the oral immunotherapy as a result of their peanut allergies. In the study, the researches observed the results of the 20 patients that were instructed to eat increasing amounts of peanuts over a period of time. The researches discovered that from the beginning of the study, patients were capable of eating as much as four grams of their peanut allergen without having any sign of an allergic response. In addition, the research group further studied how successful the immunotherapy had been by instructing the patients to cease the therapy for three months. Once the patients had returned, they were once again instructed to consume tiny portions of peanuts, and as a result the researchers found that over sixty percent of the patients still had no reaction to the allergen, which could offer a possible peanut allergy breakthrough.

When discussing the matter, professor of pediatrics at Stanford University commented,

“It is very enthralling to observe a change on such an epigenetic scale, which could possibly tell us whether or not individuals can cease their immunotherapy or if they will have to continuously digest small amounts of peanuts every day.”

Although this recent development in regard to the peanut allergy has a quality of verisimilitude, only further developments will tell whether or not this possible breakthrough is what researchers have been looking for.

Peanut Allergy: Possible Breakthrough added by Aaron Weis on February 1, 2014
View all posts by Aaron Weis &rarr


Trends in allergies around the U.S.

To assess how widespread peanut allergies are in adulthood, the researchers surveyed over 40,000 adults worldwide. Among other subjects, the participants referred to questions regarding diagnosed allergies, signs they encounter during allergic reactions, and how they usually treat allergic reactions.

The study showed that peanut allergies are far more widespread during maturity than several individuals might have known. Although a diagnosed peanut allergy was recorded by just over three percent of the participants, almost 17 percent of that population had not acquired their allergies until they were 18 or older.

Researcher Christopher Warren told Eukalert that peanut allergy tends to impact children and adults to a similar degree, unlike allergies such as milk or eggs that sometimes occur early in life and are outgrown by puberty.

The study shows that many adults do not outgrow their childhood peanut allergies and, for the first time, many adults develop peanut allergies.


Ask the Allergist: Introducing Peanuts to Infants

Michael Pistiner, MD: The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) issued new guidelines that flipped what we know about feeding highly allergenic babies back in 2017. These guidelines are specific to peanut.

What the guidelines say is that kids who are at high risk of developing peanut allergy – and they define high risk as having severe eczema, egg allergy or both – should be screened prior to having peanut introduced into the diet. The NIAID guidelines recommend this evaluation – and possible peanut introduction – happen at 4-6 months.

The screening will involve either a pediatrician sending the parents to an allergist to get their child skin tested, or the pediatrician sending the family to get a blood test to see if the child already is allergic to peanut.

Children who are at moderate risk – meaning they either have a family member with a peanut allergy or mild or moderate eczema – don’t necessarily need to be screened, but their parents should talk to a pediatrician about how and when to introduce peanut. The guidelines recommend around 6 months of age.

For children who are not at risk, the guidelines say that peanut be introduced in a developmentally appropriate way, when culturally appropriate and when appropriate to the family.

When you’re feeding a baby peanut, you want to be careful of choke risk. That means no loose nuts until age 5. Peanut butter itself can be a choke risk, too, if a baby takes a large spoonful.

The guidelines recommend two teaspoons of peanut butter three times a week – but it should be smoothed out. The study the guidelines were based on did this until the kids were age 5.

When you smooth out peanut butter, you can use pureed fruit or vegetables, breast milk or formula. You can also mix into oatmeal. As children get older and show no signs of peanut allergy, they should be able to handle different consistencies and multiple different forms of peanut foods.

Additionally, NIAID released patient resources to help with the introduction of peanut products. They include recipes and tips.

Michael Pistiner, MD, FACAAI, is a board-certified pediatric allergist and immunologist, Director of Food Allergy Advocacy, Education and Prevention of the Food Allergy Center at MassGeneral Hospital for Children in Boston, and co-creator of the educational website AllergyHome.org.

Have a medical question? Email [email protected] or write to Ask the Allergist, Allergy & Asthma Network, 8229 Boone Blvd., Suite 260, Vienna, VA 22182.

8229 Boone Blvd, Suite 260,
Vienna, VA 22182
Phone: 800-878-4403


Health experts back treatment for kids with peanut allergy

WASHINGTON (AP) — Government experts on Friday backed an experimental treatment for children with peanut allergies that could become the first federally approved option for preventing life-threatening reactions.

The treatment is daily capsules of peanut powder that gradually help children build up a tolerance.

The outside panel of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration voted overwhelmingly in favor of the treatment from Aimmune Therapeutics. The nonbinding vote amounts to an endorsement for approval.

The FDA is expected to make its final decision by January.

The panelists said the medication was an important option for parents and children dealing with peanut allergies. However, several also said they had concerns because the pill has to be taken continuously to maintain its effect.

An estimated 1.6 million children and teenagers in the U.S. would be eligible for the medication, to be sold as Palforzia, which is intended for ages 4 to 17.

Peanut allergy is the most common food allergy in the country and the standard treatment involves strictly monitoring what children eat. That approach doesn't always work and accidental exposure is common, sending 1 in 4 children with peanut allergies to the emergency room every year.

Parents at Friday's meeting urged approval of the drug, describing the anxiety of watching their children's diet and daily routine, even avoiding public places and transportation because of possible peanut residues.

"These are constant and real fears with extreme consequences," said Cathy Heald of Dallas, whose 12-year-old son Charlie took part in a study of the treatment.

Heald said her son's improved tolerance allowed him to travel overseas by himself for the first time.

"The peace of mind this treatment brings is invaluable" said Hill, whose trip to the meeting was paid by Aimmune.

After one year, about 66% of study participants who took the pills could tolerate the equivalent of three to four peanuts, compared to just 4% of patients who received a dummy treatment. At the beginning of the study, most participants could not tolerate even a minuscule amount of peanuts.

But the benefits of the treatment came with risks. More than 9% of patients taking the pills reported severe allergic reactions, more than twice the number in the placebo group. And 11% of patients dropped out of the company's study due to side effects.

"The effectiveness of the treatment has, in fact, not been demonstrated," said Dr. John Kelso, of Scripps Clinic in San Diego, who voted against the treatment.

The California-based company has previously said it expects the first six months of treatment to cost $5,000 to $10,000 and $300 to $400 a month after that. The company declined to elaborate on price earlier this week.

Aimmune is pursuing other treatments for common food allergies, including eggs. The company does not yet have any products on the market.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


Peanut allergy cure one step closer

The vast majority of children given a trial peanut allergy treatment can still safely eat peanuts four years afterwards &ndash as part of an exciting small clinical trial at the Murdoch Children&rsquos Research Institute (MCRI).

The study, which initially involved 62 children has provided the strongest evidence yet that a cure may be possible for deadly peanut allergies, providing hope to thousands of Australians living with allergies every day.

"These children had been eating peanut freely in their diet without having to follow any particular program of peanut intake in the years after treatment was completed," said lead researcher Professor Mimi Tang.

Natalie Flanjnik&rsquos 13-year-old son Joel was diagnosed with an egg and peanut allergy when he was a baby. She&rsquos been watching the study with interest, and says an effective treatment would be amazing.

&ldquoNow, if we&rsquore out and he&rsquos forgotten his EpiPen, he sometimes won&rsquot eat because he panics. It&rsquos just this constant worry.&rdquo

Reprogramming the immune system

The peanut allergy study involved splitting the children into two groups. Some were given a placebo, while others were given a combination of a probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus), together with peanut protein, every day for 18 months. The peanut protein quantity was gradually increased over time.

The treatment was designed to reprogram the immune system&rsquos response to the peanut protein.

The results at the end of the original trial in 2013 were extremely promising: 82 per cent of children who received the probiotic and peanut oral immunotherapy (PPOIT) had become tolerant to peanuts and could eat them without a reaction, compared to just four per cent from the placebo group.

Now, four years later, a follow up study published in The Lancet Child and Adolescent Health has found that the majority of those children who gained tolerance (80 per cent) are still able to eat peanuts as part of their normal diet &ndash indicating this potential treatment could have long lasting effects.

&ldquoThe importance of this finding is that these children were able to eat peanut like children who don&rsquot have peanut allergy and still maintain their tolerant state, protected against reactions to peanut. We are now examining whether these beneficial effects of our novel treatment have also resulted in improved quality of life,&rdquo said Prof. Tang.

&ldquoThese findings suggest our treatment is effective at inducing long-term tolerance, up to four years after completing treatment, and is safe,&rdquo she said.

Ten-year-old Olivia became involved in the trial when she was just two and a half. Previously a small bite of a peanut butter sandwich would cause her lips to swell.

Her mother Tanya May says being part of the PPOIT trial changed her life.


Peanut Allergies Are About to Be a Thing of the Past, Say Scientists

Food allergies suck. Whether you suffer from a severe allergy or a mild one, the fact of the matter is that they're really frustrating and often times scary. It's stressful to constantly have to double check ingredients and to make sure you don't ingest something that could be harmful to your body. It's scary when you break out in hives or your throat closes up or you feel nauseated.

FOOD ALLERGIES ARE ABSOLUTELY NO FUN.

So wouldn't it be wonderful if someone told you that you could potentially get rid of your food allergy? For those who deal with a food allergy, this would be good news, right?

Well, it's not too far off from happening, at least when it comes to peanut allergies.

An exciting new study reveals that there is a possible peanut allergy remedy.

The new remedy poses both hope and risks. So, before you start guzzling peanuts, take a look.

The New England Journal of Medicine published a study last week about the peanut remedy.

There is hope!

If approved by the U.S. government, it could make the lives of kids who suffer peanut allergies both safer and easier. The medicine could have huge commercial potential.

While the treatment, from Biotechnology company Aimmune, is exciting, there are side effects.

The treatment doesn't target the root of the problem. It's not an antibody. In actuality, Aimmune has taken a pre-existing allergy protection method and exposes children to de-fatted peanut flour to desensitize them.

Aimmune creates capsules that can then be mixed into food.

The dosage of the medicine increases over six months. The goal is to protect those with the most severe reactions.

The study showed that this is very effective for children with peanut allergies.

The whole point is for the treatment to protect those against deadly exposure to peanuts. Those with peanut allergies could then potentially live a less fearful life, constantly on edge about accidentally eating something that could be fatal.

Peanut allergies are also getting more and more common in America.

A recent study suggested that there has been a 21 percent increase in peanut allergies since 2010.

The treatment isn't the easiest thing to go through, however.

Over 10 percent of children in the study had to drop out due to their side effects from the medicine.

Investors worry that the side effects could limit the commercial opportunity.

Though it's not without fault, it's an exciting step for science and health. Hope is some of the best medicine out there.

So why exactly is a peanut allergy so stressful?

Well, for one, it's not just that you have to worry about eating peanuts. You have to be careful with products like soap, makeup, and deodorant.

You also have to diligently read every single label.

Who wants to spend their time reading labels? Besides being afraid for your life, you have to read everything before ingesting it.

Having to ask your waiter about ingredients is also tiresome.

It's hard to not feel bad about it, either. It's easy to feel like you're annoying them, even though you have to be diligent.


Health experts back treatment for kids with peanut allergy

Government experts on Friday backed an experimental treatment for children with peanut allergies that could become the first federally approved option for preventing life-threatening reactions.

The treatment is daily capsules of peanut powder that gradually help children build up a tolerance.

The outside panel of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration voted overwhelmingly in favor of the treatment from Aimmune Therapeutics. The nonbinding vote amounts to an endorsement for approval.

The FDA is expected to make its final decision by January.

The panelists said the medication was an important option for parents and children dealing with peanut allergies. However, several also said they had concerns because the pill has to be taken continuously to maintain its effect.

An estimated 1.6 million children and teenagers in the U.S. would be eligible for the medication, to be sold as Palforzia, which is intended for ages 4 to 17.

Peanut allergy is the most common food allergy in the country and the standard treatment involves strictly monitoring what children eat. That approach doesn't always work and accidental exposure is common, sending 1 in 4 children with peanut allergies to the emergency room every year.

Parents at Friday's meeting urged approval of the drug, describing the anxiety of watching their children's diet and daily routine, even avoiding public places and transportation because of possible peanut residues.

"These are constant and real fears with extreme consequences," said Cathy Heald of Dallas, whose 12-year-old son Charlie took part in a study of the treatment.

Heald said her son's improved tolerance allowed him to travel overseas by himself for the first time.

"The peace of mind this treatment brings is invaluable" said Hill, whose trip to the meeting was paid by Aimmune.

After one year, about 66% of study participants who took the pills could tolerate the equivalent of three to four peanuts, compared to just 4% of patients who received a dummy treatment. At the beginning of the study, most participants could not tolerate even a minuscule amount of peanuts.

But the benefits of the treatment came with risks. More than 9% of patients taking the pills reported severe allergic reactions, more than twice the number in the placebo group. And 11% of patients dropped out of the company's study due to side effects.

"The effectiveness of the treatment has, in fact, not been demonstrated," said Dr. John Kelso, of Scripps Clinic in San Diego, who voted against the treatment.

The California-based company has previously said it expects the first six months of treatment to cost $5,000 to $10,000 and $300 to $400 a month after that. The company declined to elaborate on price earlier this week.

Aimmune is pursuing other treatments for common food allergies, including eggs. The company does not yet have any products on the market.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


US health experts back treatment for kids with peanut allergy

article

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Government experts on Friday backed an experimental treatment for children with peanut allergies that could become the first federally approved option for preventing life-threatening reactions.

The treatment is daily capsules of peanut powder that gradually help children build up a tolerance.

The outside panel of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration voted overwhelmingly in favor of the treatment from Aimmune Therapeutics. The nonbinding vote amounts to an endorsement for approval.

The FDA is expected to make its final decision by January.

The panelists said the medication was an important option for parents and children dealing with peanut allergies. However, several also said they had concerns because the pill has to be taken continuously to maintain its effect.

An estimated 1.6 million children and teenagers in the U.S. would be eligible for the medication, to be sold as Palforzia, which is intended for ages 4 to 17.

Peanut allergy is the most common food allergy in the country and the standard treatment involves strictly monitoring what children eat. That approach doesn&apost always work and accidental exposure is common, sending 1 in 4 children with peanut allergies to the emergency room every year.

Parents at Friday&aposs meeting urged approval of the drug, describing the anxiety of watching their children&aposs diet and daily routine, even avoiding public places and transportation because of possible peanut residues.

"These are constant and real fears with extreme consequences," said Cathy Heald of Dallas, whose 12-year-old son Charlie took part in a study of the treatment.

Heald said her son&aposs improved tolerance allowed him to travel overseas by himself for the first time.

"The peace of mind this treatment brings is invaluable" said Hill, whose trip to the meeting was paid by Aimmune.

After one year, about 66% of study participants who took the pills could tolerate the equivalent of three to four peanuts, compared to just 4% of patients who received a dummy treatment. At the beginning of the study, most participants could not tolerate even a minuscule amount of peanuts.

But the benefits of the treatment came with risks. More than 9% of patients taking the pills reported severe allergic reactions, more than twice the number in the placebo group. And 11% of patients dropped out of the company&aposs study due to side effects.

"The effectiveness of the treatment has, in fact, not been demonstrated," said Dr. John Kelso, of Scripps Clinic in San Diego, who voted against the treatment.

The California-based company has previously said it expects the first six months of treatment to cost $5,000 to $10,000 and $300 to $400 a month after that. The company declined to elaborate on price earlier this week.

Aimmune is pursuing other treatments for common food allergies, including eggs. The company does not yet have any products on the market.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute&aposs Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


Health experts back treatment for kids with peanut allergy

Government experts on Friday backed an experimental treatment for children with peanut allergies that could become the first federally approved option for preventing life-threatening reactions.

WASHINGTON (AP) &mdash Government experts on Friday backed an experimental treatment for children with peanut allergies that could become the first federally approved option for preventing life-threatening reactions.

The treatment is daily capsules of peanut powder that gradually help children build up a tolerance.

The outside panel of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration voted overwhelmingly in favor of the treatment from Aimmune Therapeutics. The nonbinding vote amounts to an endorsement for approval.

The FDA is expected to make its final decision by January.

The panelists said the medication was an important option for parents and children dealing with peanut allergies. However, several also said they had concerns because the pill has to be taken continuously to maintain its effect.

An estimated 1.6 million children and teenagers in the U.S. would be eligible for the medication, to be sold as Palforzia, which is intended for ages 4 to 17.

Peanut allergy is the most common food allergy in the country and the standard treatment involves strictly monitoring what children eat. That approach doesn&rsquot always work and accidental exposure is common, sending 1 in 4 children with peanut allergies to the emergency room every year.

Parents at Friday&rsquos meeting urged approval of the drug, describing the anxiety of watching their children&rsquos diet and daily routine, even avoiding public places and transportation because of possible peanut residues.

&ldquoThese are constant and real fears with extreme consequences,&rdquo said Cathy Heald of Dallas, whose 12-year-old son Charlie took part in a study of the treatment.

Heald said her son&rsquos improved tolerance allowed him to travel overseas by himself for the first time.

&ldquoThe peace of mind this treatment brings is invaluable&rdquo said Hill, whose trip to the meeting was paid by Aimmune.

After one year, about 66% of study participants who took the pills could tolerate the equivalent of three to four peanuts, compared to just 4% of patients who received a dummy treatment. At the beginning of the study, most participants could not tolerate even a minuscule amount of peanuts.

But the benefits of the treatment came with risks. More than 9% of patients taking the pills reported severe allergic reactions, more than twice the number in the placebo group. And 11% of patients dropped out of the company&rsquos study due to side effects.

&ldquoThe effectiveness of the treatment has, in fact, not been demonstrated,&rdquo said Dr. John Kelso, of Scripps Clinic in San Diego, who voted against the treatment.

The California-based company has previously said it expects the first six months of treatment to cost $5,000 to $10,000 and $300 to $400 a month after that. The company declined to elaborate on price earlier this week.

Aimmune is pursuing other treatments for common food allergies, including eggs. The company does not yet have any products on the market.

Follow Matthew Perrone on Twitter: @AP_FDAwriter

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute&rsquos Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.



Comments:

  1. Bradley

    What does it plan?

  2. Kristanna

    I am of course sorry, I would like to suggest a different solution.

  3. Nakazahn

    I read a lot on this topic today.



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