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Can You Guess Which Cereal Has the Same Percentage of Sugar as a Hershey Bar?

Can You Guess Which Cereal Has the Same Percentage of Sugar as a Hershey Bar?


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The sheer quantity of sugar in this cereal is mind-blowing

It's not a part of a complete balanced breakfast.

We all know that some cereals are absolutely loaded with sugar; just eat a spoonful and your teeth will start hurting. One cereal in particular has more sugar than any other out there, with an even higher percentage of sugar than many candy bars.

That cereal? Honey Smacks. The most sugar-dense cereal on the market today, they were introduced as Sugar Smacks in 1953, then changed to Honey Smacks, then Smacks, then back to Honey Smacks. The cereal that made Dig ‘Em famous is a whopping 55.6 percent sugar, and a 35-gram serving contains 19.4 grams of sugar, equal to nearly five packets of sugar or almost two Krispy Kreme original glazed doughnuts.

Let’s compare that to a milk chocolate Hershey bar, which contains 41 grams of sugar in a 73-gram serving. Do the math and it clocks in at 56.1 percent sugar, nearly the same as Honey Smacks. You’ll need to eat two servings of Smacks to down the same amount of sugar as a Hershey Bar, but if you’ve ever helped yourself to a second bowl of cereal, you’ll know that’s not so hard to do.


It’s Just Not the Same…

I’m going to be honest, the fact that State College has a Wegmans did actually play a part (okay a tiny one) in solidifying my decision to come to Penn State. Why? Because of this:

The international food aisle, where I can settle my fix for British candy. Regardless of the fact I come from a town with an M&M factory and the next town over is Hershey, PA (Chocolate Town USA), I find American chocolate severely lacking when compared to the glory of Cadbury and other British “sweets”. My English family knows to bring a care package of sweets for me whenever they visit, which I hoard for as long as possible. For there are only a few places stateside that sell my favourite British chocolates, Wegmans being one of them.

A BBC News article actually explains why American and British chocolates taste so unalike. The difference lies in the percentage of cocoa solids. A Hershey bar only contains 10% cocoa solids, whereas a Cadbury contains 23%. They also differ in the type of powdered milk used, and Hershey chocolate tends to have more sugar and an added ingredient, PGPR, that can replace the expensive cocoa butter.

While I actually advocate that nipping over to the local shop and trying each candy bar that tickles your fancy as the only sure way to really know what each one is like, here is a quick descriptive guide to the myriad of British sweets. Some are quite like American candy bars in principle, but others require more explanation.

Cadbury– I’ll start with a basic one that is actually quite available here in the US ( so if this post makes you hungry, you’re in luck). Cadbury’s is the largest chocolate company in England and specializes in dairy milk. No matter what the singing cows at Hershey Chocolate World say, Cadbury’s actually lives up to it’s “dairy milk” title- it’s wonderfully creamy (To those of you who don’t live close enough to Hershey to have the entire chocolate factory tour ride memorized, I apologise). The basic chocolate bar also has versions with fruits and nuts, oreos, turkish delight, toffee, caramel, and pretzels.

In addition, Cadbury also makes other chocolate bars:

Wispa– velvety milk chocolate with tiny dense air bubbles (my absolute favourite!)

Time-Out – basically like a Kit-Kat, but you, know, with better chocolate

Flake– crumbled “flakes” of milk chocolate held together by some magical way. We stick a Flake in our vanilla ice cream cones and call it a Flake 99, which you can get from any ice cream vendor.

Twirl– basically a flake, but then dipped and covered in chocolate (you’ll find the British do a lot of coating things in chocolate, for example….)

Chomp– a piece of chewy caramel, covered in chocolate

Fudge– a finger of fudge…..covered in chocolate

Curly Wurly– same thing as a Chomp, but with air bubbles

Crunchie– honeycomb ….wrapped in chocolate –>

Picnic– biscuits, raisins, caramel, nuts, puffed rice and nougat….covered in chocolate

Double Decker– layers of crispy cereal and nougatine, covered in chocolate (bit like a Crunch bar)

Boost– crushed energy-infused biscuit encased in caramel and (guess what?) covered in chocolate

Star Bar– same thing as a Boost but with peanuts inside as well

Cadbury Creme Egg– only available from December to around two weeks after Easter,consists of a yellow/white cream filling in a chocolate shell. This I’ve actually seen many times in grocery stores here.

Mars Bar– nougat and caramel in chocolate (what else?), so like a Milky Way almost.

Nestle
Even though Nestle sells chocolate here in the US, it also makes two of my favourite British candies

Smarties– are not sold here due to their unfortunate similarity to M&Ms. They come is brighter colours and the shells tastes different, better in my opinion.
Photo: fritish

Aero– similar to Wispa, but with bigger air bubbles

You know how Dove tends to market itself as finer, richer, and smoother than Hershey’s? Galaxy is like that. Galaxy chocolate is the smoothest, creamiest chocolate you’ll find outside of Switzerland or Belgium. Galaxy makes Minstrels, which are like large M&Ms but with a different tasting shell Hershey’s Drops are an imitation.

Terry’s Chocolate– known primarily for the Chocolate Orange Ball, which is segments of orange-flavoured chocolate, a Christmastime favourite.

Maltesers– malt honeycomb balls dipped in chocolate, somewhat similar to Whoppers.

To be fair, I feel I ought to mention some non-chocolate British sweets.

Jelly Babies– gummies shaped like what somewhat look like Teletubbies. However, Jelly babies are much softer and squishier and less chewy-stick-to-your-teeth like American gummies tend to be, with the insides being just a step off from liquid.

Wine Gums– these are chewy like American gummies. Different shapes correspond with different wines (Cabernet,Claret, Port, Sherry, Brandy, Burgundy, Gin, Cider, Cognac, and Rum). Please note: wine gums do not actually contain any alcohol. Though it was very fun convincing my cousin that you could become drunk from eating them.
photo: Destiny’s Agent

Jammie Dodgers– simply a shortbread biscuit sandwiched around some strawberry jam. Great for tea time

If it explains anything, last year Brits spent £3.4 million on chocolate.


It’s Just Not the Same…

I’m going to be honest, the fact that State College has a Wegmans did actually play a part (okay a tiny one) in solidifying my decision to come to Penn State. Why? Because of this:

The international food aisle, where I can settle my fix for British candy. Regardless of the fact I come from a town with an M&M factory and the next town over is Hershey, PA (Chocolate Town USA), I find American chocolate severely lacking when compared to the glory of Cadbury and other British “sweets”. My English family knows to bring a care package of sweets for me whenever they visit, which I hoard for as long as possible. For there are only a few places stateside that sell my favourite British chocolates, Wegmans being one of them.

A BBC News article actually explains why American and British chocolates taste so unalike. The difference lies in the percentage of cocoa solids. A Hershey bar only contains 10% cocoa solids, whereas a Cadbury contains 23%. They also differ in the type of powdered milk used, and Hershey chocolate tends to have more sugar and an added ingredient, PGPR, that can replace the expensive cocoa butter.

While I actually advocate that nipping over to the local shop and trying each candy bar that tickles your fancy as the only sure way to really know what each one is like, here is a quick descriptive guide to the myriad of British sweets. Some are quite like American candy bars in principle, but others require more explanation.

Cadbury– I’ll start with a basic one that is actually quite available here in the US ( so if this post makes you hungry, you’re in luck). Cadbury’s is the largest chocolate company in England and specializes in dairy milk. No matter what the singing cows at Hershey Chocolate World say, Cadbury’s actually lives up to it’s “dairy milk” title- it’s wonderfully creamy (To those of you who don’t live close enough to Hershey to have the entire chocolate factory tour ride memorized, I apologise). The basic chocolate bar also has versions with fruits and nuts, oreos, turkish delight, toffee, caramel, and pretzels.

In addition, Cadbury also makes other chocolate bars:

Wispa– velvety milk chocolate with tiny dense air bubbles (my absolute favourite!)

Time-Out – basically like a Kit-Kat, but you, know, with better chocolate

Flake– crumbled “flakes” of milk chocolate held together by some magical way. We stick a Flake in our vanilla ice cream cones and call it a Flake 99, which you can get from any ice cream vendor.

Twirl– basically a flake, but then dipped and covered in chocolate (you’ll find the British do a lot of coating things in chocolate, for example….)

Chomp– a piece of chewy caramel, covered in chocolate

Fudge– a finger of fudge…..covered in chocolate

Curly Wurly– same thing as a Chomp, but with air bubbles

Crunchie– honeycomb ….wrapped in chocolate –>

Picnic– biscuits, raisins, caramel, nuts, puffed rice and nougat….covered in chocolate

Double Decker– layers of crispy cereal and nougatine, covered in chocolate (bit like a Crunch bar)

Boost– crushed energy-infused biscuit encased in caramel and (guess what?) covered in chocolate

Star Bar– same thing as a Boost but with peanuts inside as well

Cadbury Creme Egg– only available from December to around two weeks after Easter,consists of a yellow/white cream filling in a chocolate shell. This I’ve actually seen many times in grocery stores here.

Mars Bar– nougat and caramel in chocolate (what else?), so like a Milky Way almost.

Nestle
Even though Nestle sells chocolate here in the US, it also makes two of my favourite British candies

Smarties– are not sold here due to their unfortunate similarity to M&Ms. They come is brighter colours and the shells tastes different, better in my opinion.
Photo: fritish

Aero– similar to Wispa, but with bigger air bubbles

You know how Dove tends to market itself as finer, richer, and smoother than Hershey’s? Galaxy is like that. Galaxy chocolate is the smoothest, creamiest chocolate you’ll find outside of Switzerland or Belgium. Galaxy makes Minstrels, which are like large M&Ms but with a different tasting shell Hershey’s Drops are an imitation.

Terry’s Chocolate– known primarily for the Chocolate Orange Ball, which is segments of orange-flavoured chocolate, a Christmastime favourite.

Maltesers– malt honeycomb balls dipped in chocolate, somewhat similar to Whoppers.

To be fair, I feel I ought to mention some non-chocolate British sweets.

Jelly Babies– gummies shaped like what somewhat look like Teletubbies. However, Jelly babies are much softer and squishier and less chewy-stick-to-your-teeth like American gummies tend to be, with the insides being just a step off from liquid.

Wine Gums– these are chewy like American gummies. Different shapes correspond with different wines (Cabernet,Claret, Port, Sherry, Brandy, Burgundy, Gin, Cider, Cognac, and Rum). Please note: wine gums do not actually contain any alcohol. Though it was very fun convincing my cousin that you could become drunk from eating them.
photo: Destiny’s Agent

Jammie Dodgers– simply a shortbread biscuit sandwiched around some strawberry jam. Great for tea time

If it explains anything, last year Brits spent £3.4 million on chocolate.


It’s Just Not the Same…

I’m going to be honest, the fact that State College has a Wegmans did actually play a part (okay a tiny one) in solidifying my decision to come to Penn State. Why? Because of this:

The international food aisle, where I can settle my fix for British candy. Regardless of the fact I come from a town with an M&M factory and the next town over is Hershey, PA (Chocolate Town USA), I find American chocolate severely lacking when compared to the glory of Cadbury and other British “sweets”. My English family knows to bring a care package of sweets for me whenever they visit, which I hoard for as long as possible. For there are only a few places stateside that sell my favourite British chocolates, Wegmans being one of them.

A BBC News article actually explains why American and British chocolates taste so unalike. The difference lies in the percentage of cocoa solids. A Hershey bar only contains 10% cocoa solids, whereas a Cadbury contains 23%. They also differ in the type of powdered milk used, and Hershey chocolate tends to have more sugar and an added ingredient, PGPR, that can replace the expensive cocoa butter.

While I actually advocate that nipping over to the local shop and trying each candy bar that tickles your fancy as the only sure way to really know what each one is like, here is a quick descriptive guide to the myriad of British sweets. Some are quite like American candy bars in principle, but others require more explanation.

Cadbury– I’ll start with a basic one that is actually quite available here in the US ( so if this post makes you hungry, you’re in luck). Cadbury’s is the largest chocolate company in England and specializes in dairy milk. No matter what the singing cows at Hershey Chocolate World say, Cadbury’s actually lives up to it’s “dairy milk” title- it’s wonderfully creamy (To those of you who don’t live close enough to Hershey to have the entire chocolate factory tour ride memorized, I apologise). The basic chocolate bar also has versions with fruits and nuts, oreos, turkish delight, toffee, caramel, and pretzels.

In addition, Cadbury also makes other chocolate bars:

Wispa– velvety milk chocolate with tiny dense air bubbles (my absolute favourite!)

Time-Out – basically like a Kit-Kat, but you, know, with better chocolate

Flake– crumbled “flakes” of milk chocolate held together by some magical way. We stick a Flake in our vanilla ice cream cones and call it a Flake 99, which you can get from any ice cream vendor.

Twirl– basically a flake, but then dipped and covered in chocolate (you’ll find the British do a lot of coating things in chocolate, for example….)

Chomp– a piece of chewy caramel, covered in chocolate

Fudge– a finger of fudge…..covered in chocolate

Curly Wurly– same thing as a Chomp, but with air bubbles

Crunchie– honeycomb ….wrapped in chocolate –>

Picnic– biscuits, raisins, caramel, nuts, puffed rice and nougat….covered in chocolate

Double Decker– layers of crispy cereal and nougatine, covered in chocolate (bit like a Crunch bar)

Boost– crushed energy-infused biscuit encased in caramel and (guess what?) covered in chocolate

Star Bar– same thing as a Boost but with peanuts inside as well

Cadbury Creme Egg– only available from December to around two weeks after Easter,consists of a yellow/white cream filling in a chocolate shell. This I’ve actually seen many times in grocery stores here.

Mars Bar– nougat and caramel in chocolate (what else?), so like a Milky Way almost.

Nestle
Even though Nestle sells chocolate here in the US, it also makes two of my favourite British candies

Smarties– are not sold here due to their unfortunate similarity to M&Ms. They come is brighter colours and the shells tastes different, better in my opinion.
Photo: fritish

Aero– similar to Wispa, but with bigger air bubbles

You know how Dove tends to market itself as finer, richer, and smoother than Hershey’s? Galaxy is like that. Galaxy chocolate is the smoothest, creamiest chocolate you’ll find outside of Switzerland or Belgium. Galaxy makes Minstrels, which are like large M&Ms but with a different tasting shell Hershey’s Drops are an imitation.

Terry’s Chocolate– known primarily for the Chocolate Orange Ball, which is segments of orange-flavoured chocolate, a Christmastime favourite.

Maltesers– malt honeycomb balls dipped in chocolate, somewhat similar to Whoppers.

To be fair, I feel I ought to mention some non-chocolate British sweets.

Jelly Babies– gummies shaped like what somewhat look like Teletubbies. However, Jelly babies are much softer and squishier and less chewy-stick-to-your-teeth like American gummies tend to be, with the insides being just a step off from liquid.

Wine Gums– these are chewy like American gummies. Different shapes correspond with different wines (Cabernet,Claret, Port, Sherry, Brandy, Burgundy, Gin, Cider, Cognac, and Rum). Please note: wine gums do not actually contain any alcohol. Though it was very fun convincing my cousin that you could become drunk from eating them.
photo: Destiny’s Agent

Jammie Dodgers– simply a shortbread biscuit sandwiched around some strawberry jam. Great for tea time

If it explains anything, last year Brits spent £3.4 million on chocolate.


It’s Just Not the Same…

I’m going to be honest, the fact that State College has a Wegmans did actually play a part (okay a tiny one) in solidifying my decision to come to Penn State. Why? Because of this:

The international food aisle, where I can settle my fix for British candy. Regardless of the fact I come from a town with an M&M factory and the next town over is Hershey, PA (Chocolate Town USA), I find American chocolate severely lacking when compared to the glory of Cadbury and other British “sweets”. My English family knows to bring a care package of sweets for me whenever they visit, which I hoard for as long as possible. For there are only a few places stateside that sell my favourite British chocolates, Wegmans being one of them.

A BBC News article actually explains why American and British chocolates taste so unalike. The difference lies in the percentage of cocoa solids. A Hershey bar only contains 10% cocoa solids, whereas a Cadbury contains 23%. They also differ in the type of powdered milk used, and Hershey chocolate tends to have more sugar and an added ingredient, PGPR, that can replace the expensive cocoa butter.

While I actually advocate that nipping over to the local shop and trying each candy bar that tickles your fancy as the only sure way to really know what each one is like, here is a quick descriptive guide to the myriad of British sweets. Some are quite like American candy bars in principle, but others require more explanation.

Cadbury– I’ll start with a basic one that is actually quite available here in the US ( so if this post makes you hungry, you’re in luck). Cadbury’s is the largest chocolate company in England and specializes in dairy milk. No matter what the singing cows at Hershey Chocolate World say, Cadbury’s actually lives up to it’s “dairy milk” title- it’s wonderfully creamy (To those of you who don’t live close enough to Hershey to have the entire chocolate factory tour ride memorized, I apologise). The basic chocolate bar also has versions with fruits and nuts, oreos, turkish delight, toffee, caramel, and pretzels.

In addition, Cadbury also makes other chocolate bars:

Wispa– velvety milk chocolate with tiny dense air bubbles (my absolute favourite!)

Time-Out – basically like a Kit-Kat, but you, know, with better chocolate

Flake– crumbled “flakes” of milk chocolate held together by some magical way. We stick a Flake in our vanilla ice cream cones and call it a Flake 99, which you can get from any ice cream vendor.

Twirl– basically a flake, but then dipped and covered in chocolate (you’ll find the British do a lot of coating things in chocolate, for example….)

Chomp– a piece of chewy caramel, covered in chocolate

Fudge– a finger of fudge…..covered in chocolate

Curly Wurly– same thing as a Chomp, but with air bubbles

Crunchie– honeycomb ….wrapped in chocolate –>

Picnic– biscuits, raisins, caramel, nuts, puffed rice and nougat….covered in chocolate

Double Decker– layers of crispy cereal and nougatine, covered in chocolate (bit like a Crunch bar)

Boost– crushed energy-infused biscuit encased in caramel and (guess what?) covered in chocolate

Star Bar– same thing as a Boost but with peanuts inside as well

Cadbury Creme Egg– only available from December to around two weeks after Easter,consists of a yellow/white cream filling in a chocolate shell. This I’ve actually seen many times in grocery stores here.

Mars Bar– nougat and caramel in chocolate (what else?), so like a Milky Way almost.

Nestle
Even though Nestle sells chocolate here in the US, it also makes two of my favourite British candies

Smarties– are not sold here due to their unfortunate similarity to M&Ms. They come is brighter colours and the shells tastes different, better in my opinion.
Photo: fritish

Aero– similar to Wispa, but with bigger air bubbles

You know how Dove tends to market itself as finer, richer, and smoother than Hershey’s? Galaxy is like that. Galaxy chocolate is the smoothest, creamiest chocolate you’ll find outside of Switzerland or Belgium. Galaxy makes Minstrels, which are like large M&Ms but with a different tasting shell Hershey’s Drops are an imitation.

Terry’s Chocolate– known primarily for the Chocolate Orange Ball, which is segments of orange-flavoured chocolate, a Christmastime favourite.

Maltesers– malt honeycomb balls dipped in chocolate, somewhat similar to Whoppers.

To be fair, I feel I ought to mention some non-chocolate British sweets.

Jelly Babies– gummies shaped like what somewhat look like Teletubbies. However, Jelly babies are much softer and squishier and less chewy-stick-to-your-teeth like American gummies tend to be, with the insides being just a step off from liquid.

Wine Gums– these are chewy like American gummies. Different shapes correspond with different wines (Cabernet,Claret, Port, Sherry, Brandy, Burgundy, Gin, Cider, Cognac, and Rum). Please note: wine gums do not actually contain any alcohol. Though it was very fun convincing my cousin that you could become drunk from eating them.
photo: Destiny’s Agent

Jammie Dodgers– simply a shortbread biscuit sandwiched around some strawberry jam. Great for tea time

If it explains anything, last year Brits spent £3.4 million on chocolate.


It’s Just Not the Same…

I’m going to be honest, the fact that State College has a Wegmans did actually play a part (okay a tiny one) in solidifying my decision to come to Penn State. Why? Because of this:

The international food aisle, where I can settle my fix for British candy. Regardless of the fact I come from a town with an M&M factory and the next town over is Hershey, PA (Chocolate Town USA), I find American chocolate severely lacking when compared to the glory of Cadbury and other British “sweets”. My English family knows to bring a care package of sweets for me whenever they visit, which I hoard for as long as possible. For there are only a few places stateside that sell my favourite British chocolates, Wegmans being one of them.

A BBC News article actually explains why American and British chocolates taste so unalike. The difference lies in the percentage of cocoa solids. A Hershey bar only contains 10% cocoa solids, whereas a Cadbury contains 23%. They also differ in the type of powdered milk used, and Hershey chocolate tends to have more sugar and an added ingredient, PGPR, that can replace the expensive cocoa butter.

While I actually advocate that nipping over to the local shop and trying each candy bar that tickles your fancy as the only sure way to really know what each one is like, here is a quick descriptive guide to the myriad of British sweets. Some are quite like American candy bars in principle, but others require more explanation.

Cadbury– I’ll start with a basic one that is actually quite available here in the US ( so if this post makes you hungry, you’re in luck). Cadbury’s is the largest chocolate company in England and specializes in dairy milk. No matter what the singing cows at Hershey Chocolate World say, Cadbury’s actually lives up to it’s “dairy milk” title- it’s wonderfully creamy (To those of you who don’t live close enough to Hershey to have the entire chocolate factory tour ride memorized, I apologise). The basic chocolate bar also has versions with fruits and nuts, oreos, turkish delight, toffee, caramel, and pretzels.

In addition, Cadbury also makes other chocolate bars:

Wispa– velvety milk chocolate with tiny dense air bubbles (my absolute favourite!)

Time-Out – basically like a Kit-Kat, but you, know, with better chocolate

Flake– crumbled “flakes” of milk chocolate held together by some magical way. We stick a Flake in our vanilla ice cream cones and call it a Flake 99, which you can get from any ice cream vendor.

Twirl– basically a flake, but then dipped and covered in chocolate (you’ll find the British do a lot of coating things in chocolate, for example….)

Chomp– a piece of chewy caramel, covered in chocolate

Fudge– a finger of fudge…..covered in chocolate

Curly Wurly– same thing as a Chomp, but with air bubbles

Crunchie– honeycomb ….wrapped in chocolate –>

Picnic– biscuits, raisins, caramel, nuts, puffed rice and nougat….covered in chocolate

Double Decker– layers of crispy cereal and nougatine, covered in chocolate (bit like a Crunch bar)

Boost– crushed energy-infused biscuit encased in caramel and (guess what?) covered in chocolate

Star Bar– same thing as a Boost but with peanuts inside as well

Cadbury Creme Egg– only available from December to around two weeks after Easter,consists of a yellow/white cream filling in a chocolate shell. This I’ve actually seen many times in grocery stores here.

Mars Bar– nougat and caramel in chocolate (what else?), so like a Milky Way almost.

Nestle
Even though Nestle sells chocolate here in the US, it also makes two of my favourite British candies

Smarties– are not sold here due to their unfortunate similarity to M&Ms. They come is brighter colours and the shells tastes different, better in my opinion.
Photo: fritish

Aero– similar to Wispa, but with bigger air bubbles

You know how Dove tends to market itself as finer, richer, and smoother than Hershey’s? Galaxy is like that. Galaxy chocolate is the smoothest, creamiest chocolate you’ll find outside of Switzerland or Belgium. Galaxy makes Minstrels, which are like large M&Ms but with a different tasting shell Hershey’s Drops are an imitation.

Terry’s Chocolate– known primarily for the Chocolate Orange Ball, which is segments of orange-flavoured chocolate, a Christmastime favourite.

Maltesers– malt honeycomb balls dipped in chocolate, somewhat similar to Whoppers.

To be fair, I feel I ought to mention some non-chocolate British sweets.

Jelly Babies– gummies shaped like what somewhat look like Teletubbies. However, Jelly babies are much softer and squishier and less chewy-stick-to-your-teeth like American gummies tend to be, with the insides being just a step off from liquid.

Wine Gums– these are chewy like American gummies. Different shapes correspond with different wines (Cabernet,Claret, Port, Sherry, Brandy, Burgundy, Gin, Cider, Cognac, and Rum). Please note: wine gums do not actually contain any alcohol. Though it was very fun convincing my cousin that you could become drunk from eating them.
photo: Destiny’s Agent

Jammie Dodgers– simply a shortbread biscuit sandwiched around some strawberry jam. Great for tea time

If it explains anything, last year Brits spent £3.4 million on chocolate.


It’s Just Not the Same…

I’m going to be honest, the fact that State College has a Wegmans did actually play a part (okay a tiny one) in solidifying my decision to come to Penn State. Why? Because of this:

The international food aisle, where I can settle my fix for British candy. Regardless of the fact I come from a town with an M&M factory and the next town over is Hershey, PA (Chocolate Town USA), I find American chocolate severely lacking when compared to the glory of Cadbury and other British “sweets”. My English family knows to bring a care package of sweets for me whenever they visit, which I hoard for as long as possible. For there are only a few places stateside that sell my favourite British chocolates, Wegmans being one of them.

A BBC News article actually explains why American and British chocolates taste so unalike. The difference lies in the percentage of cocoa solids. A Hershey bar only contains 10% cocoa solids, whereas a Cadbury contains 23%. They also differ in the type of powdered milk used, and Hershey chocolate tends to have more sugar and an added ingredient, PGPR, that can replace the expensive cocoa butter.

While I actually advocate that nipping over to the local shop and trying each candy bar that tickles your fancy as the only sure way to really know what each one is like, here is a quick descriptive guide to the myriad of British sweets. Some are quite like American candy bars in principle, but others require more explanation.

Cadbury– I’ll start with a basic one that is actually quite available here in the US ( so if this post makes you hungry, you’re in luck). Cadbury’s is the largest chocolate company in England and specializes in dairy milk. No matter what the singing cows at Hershey Chocolate World say, Cadbury’s actually lives up to it’s “dairy milk” title- it’s wonderfully creamy (To those of you who don’t live close enough to Hershey to have the entire chocolate factory tour ride memorized, I apologise). The basic chocolate bar also has versions with fruits and nuts, oreos, turkish delight, toffee, caramel, and pretzels.

In addition, Cadbury also makes other chocolate bars:

Wispa– velvety milk chocolate with tiny dense air bubbles (my absolute favourite!)

Time-Out – basically like a Kit-Kat, but you, know, with better chocolate

Flake– crumbled “flakes” of milk chocolate held together by some magical way. We stick a Flake in our vanilla ice cream cones and call it a Flake 99, which you can get from any ice cream vendor.

Twirl– basically a flake, but then dipped and covered in chocolate (you’ll find the British do a lot of coating things in chocolate, for example….)

Chomp– a piece of chewy caramel, covered in chocolate

Fudge– a finger of fudge…..covered in chocolate

Curly Wurly– same thing as a Chomp, but with air bubbles

Crunchie– honeycomb ….wrapped in chocolate –>

Picnic– biscuits, raisins, caramel, nuts, puffed rice and nougat….covered in chocolate

Double Decker– layers of crispy cereal and nougatine, covered in chocolate (bit like a Crunch bar)

Boost– crushed energy-infused biscuit encased in caramel and (guess what?) covered in chocolate

Star Bar– same thing as a Boost but with peanuts inside as well

Cadbury Creme Egg– only available from December to around two weeks after Easter,consists of a yellow/white cream filling in a chocolate shell. This I’ve actually seen many times in grocery stores here.

Mars Bar– nougat and caramel in chocolate (what else?), so like a Milky Way almost.

Nestle
Even though Nestle sells chocolate here in the US, it also makes two of my favourite British candies

Smarties– are not sold here due to their unfortunate similarity to M&Ms. They come is brighter colours and the shells tastes different, better in my opinion.
Photo: fritish

Aero– similar to Wispa, but with bigger air bubbles

You know how Dove tends to market itself as finer, richer, and smoother than Hershey’s? Galaxy is like that. Galaxy chocolate is the smoothest, creamiest chocolate you’ll find outside of Switzerland or Belgium. Galaxy makes Minstrels, which are like large M&Ms but with a different tasting shell Hershey’s Drops are an imitation.

Terry’s Chocolate– known primarily for the Chocolate Orange Ball, which is segments of orange-flavoured chocolate, a Christmastime favourite.

Maltesers– malt honeycomb balls dipped in chocolate, somewhat similar to Whoppers.

To be fair, I feel I ought to mention some non-chocolate British sweets.

Jelly Babies– gummies shaped like what somewhat look like Teletubbies. However, Jelly babies are much softer and squishier and less chewy-stick-to-your-teeth like American gummies tend to be, with the insides being just a step off from liquid.

Wine Gums– these are chewy like American gummies. Different shapes correspond with different wines (Cabernet,Claret, Port, Sherry, Brandy, Burgundy, Gin, Cider, Cognac, and Rum). Please note: wine gums do not actually contain any alcohol. Though it was very fun convincing my cousin that you could become drunk from eating them.
photo: Destiny’s Agent

Jammie Dodgers– simply a shortbread biscuit sandwiched around some strawberry jam. Great for tea time

If it explains anything, last year Brits spent £3.4 million on chocolate.


It’s Just Not the Same…

I’m going to be honest, the fact that State College has a Wegmans did actually play a part (okay a tiny one) in solidifying my decision to come to Penn State. Why? Because of this:

The international food aisle, where I can settle my fix for British candy. Regardless of the fact I come from a town with an M&M factory and the next town over is Hershey, PA (Chocolate Town USA), I find American chocolate severely lacking when compared to the glory of Cadbury and other British “sweets”. My English family knows to bring a care package of sweets for me whenever they visit, which I hoard for as long as possible. For there are only a few places stateside that sell my favourite British chocolates, Wegmans being one of them.

A BBC News article actually explains why American and British chocolates taste so unalike. The difference lies in the percentage of cocoa solids. A Hershey bar only contains 10% cocoa solids, whereas a Cadbury contains 23%. They also differ in the type of powdered milk used, and Hershey chocolate tends to have more sugar and an added ingredient, PGPR, that can replace the expensive cocoa butter.

While I actually advocate that nipping over to the local shop and trying each candy bar that tickles your fancy as the only sure way to really know what each one is like, here is a quick descriptive guide to the myriad of British sweets. Some are quite like American candy bars in principle, but others require more explanation.

Cadbury– I’ll start with a basic one that is actually quite available here in the US ( so if this post makes you hungry, you’re in luck). Cadbury’s is the largest chocolate company in England and specializes in dairy milk. No matter what the singing cows at Hershey Chocolate World say, Cadbury’s actually lives up to it’s “dairy milk” title- it’s wonderfully creamy (To those of you who don’t live close enough to Hershey to have the entire chocolate factory tour ride memorized, I apologise). The basic chocolate bar also has versions with fruits and nuts, oreos, turkish delight, toffee, caramel, and pretzels.

In addition, Cadbury also makes other chocolate bars:

Wispa– velvety milk chocolate with tiny dense air bubbles (my absolute favourite!)

Time-Out – basically like a Kit-Kat, but you, know, with better chocolate

Flake– crumbled “flakes” of milk chocolate held together by some magical way. We stick a Flake in our vanilla ice cream cones and call it a Flake 99, which you can get from any ice cream vendor.

Twirl– basically a flake, but then dipped and covered in chocolate (you’ll find the British do a lot of coating things in chocolate, for example….)

Chomp– a piece of chewy caramel, covered in chocolate

Fudge– a finger of fudge…..covered in chocolate

Curly Wurly– same thing as a Chomp, but with air bubbles

Crunchie– honeycomb ….wrapped in chocolate –>

Picnic– biscuits, raisins, caramel, nuts, puffed rice and nougat….covered in chocolate

Double Decker– layers of crispy cereal and nougatine, covered in chocolate (bit like a Crunch bar)

Boost– crushed energy-infused biscuit encased in caramel and (guess what?) covered in chocolate

Star Bar– same thing as a Boost but with peanuts inside as well

Cadbury Creme Egg– only available from December to around two weeks after Easter,consists of a yellow/white cream filling in a chocolate shell. This I’ve actually seen many times in grocery stores here.

Mars Bar– nougat and caramel in chocolate (what else?), so like a Milky Way almost.

Nestle
Even though Nestle sells chocolate here in the US, it also makes two of my favourite British candies

Smarties– are not sold here due to their unfortunate similarity to M&Ms. They come is brighter colours and the shells tastes different, better in my opinion.
Photo: fritish

Aero– similar to Wispa, but with bigger air bubbles

You know how Dove tends to market itself as finer, richer, and smoother than Hershey’s? Galaxy is like that. Galaxy chocolate is the smoothest, creamiest chocolate you’ll find outside of Switzerland or Belgium. Galaxy makes Minstrels, which are like large M&Ms but with a different tasting shell Hershey’s Drops are an imitation.

Terry’s Chocolate– known primarily for the Chocolate Orange Ball, which is segments of orange-flavoured chocolate, a Christmastime favourite.

Maltesers– malt honeycomb balls dipped in chocolate, somewhat similar to Whoppers.

To be fair, I feel I ought to mention some non-chocolate British sweets.

Jelly Babies– gummies shaped like what somewhat look like Teletubbies. However, Jelly babies are much softer and squishier and less chewy-stick-to-your-teeth like American gummies tend to be, with the insides being just a step off from liquid.

Wine Gums– these are chewy like American gummies. Different shapes correspond with different wines (Cabernet,Claret, Port, Sherry, Brandy, Burgundy, Gin, Cider, Cognac, and Rum). Please note: wine gums do not actually contain any alcohol. Though it was very fun convincing my cousin that you could become drunk from eating them.
photo: Destiny’s Agent

Jammie Dodgers– simply a shortbread biscuit sandwiched around some strawberry jam. Great for tea time

If it explains anything, last year Brits spent £3.4 million on chocolate.


It’s Just Not the Same…

I’m going to be honest, the fact that State College has a Wegmans did actually play a part (okay a tiny one) in solidifying my decision to come to Penn State. Why? Because of this:

The international food aisle, where I can settle my fix for British candy. Regardless of the fact I come from a town with an M&M factory and the next town over is Hershey, PA (Chocolate Town USA), I find American chocolate severely lacking when compared to the glory of Cadbury and other British “sweets”. My English family knows to bring a care package of sweets for me whenever they visit, which I hoard for as long as possible. For there are only a few places stateside that sell my favourite British chocolates, Wegmans being one of them.

A BBC News article actually explains why American and British chocolates taste so unalike. The difference lies in the percentage of cocoa solids. A Hershey bar only contains 10% cocoa solids, whereas a Cadbury contains 23%. They also differ in the type of powdered milk used, and Hershey chocolate tends to have more sugar and an added ingredient, PGPR, that can replace the expensive cocoa butter.

While I actually advocate that nipping over to the local shop and trying each candy bar that tickles your fancy as the only sure way to really know what each one is like, here is a quick descriptive guide to the myriad of British sweets. Some are quite like American candy bars in principle, but others require more explanation.

Cadbury– I’ll start with a basic one that is actually quite available here in the US ( so if this post makes you hungry, you’re in luck). Cadbury’s is the largest chocolate company in England and specializes in dairy milk. No matter what the singing cows at Hershey Chocolate World say, Cadbury’s actually lives up to it’s “dairy milk” title- it’s wonderfully creamy (To those of you who don’t live close enough to Hershey to have the entire chocolate factory tour ride memorized, I apologise). The basic chocolate bar also has versions with fruits and nuts, oreos, turkish delight, toffee, caramel, and pretzels.

In addition, Cadbury also makes other chocolate bars:

Wispa– velvety milk chocolate with tiny dense air bubbles (my absolute favourite!)

Time-Out – basically like a Kit-Kat, but you, know, with better chocolate

Flake– crumbled “flakes” of milk chocolate held together by some magical way. We stick a Flake in our vanilla ice cream cones and call it a Flake 99, which you can get from any ice cream vendor.

Twirl– basically a flake, but then dipped and covered in chocolate (you’ll find the British do a lot of coating things in chocolate, for example….)

Chomp– a piece of chewy caramel, covered in chocolate

Fudge– a finger of fudge…..covered in chocolate

Curly Wurly– same thing as a Chomp, but with air bubbles

Crunchie– honeycomb ….wrapped in chocolate –>

Picnic– biscuits, raisins, caramel, nuts, puffed rice and nougat….covered in chocolate

Double Decker– layers of crispy cereal and nougatine, covered in chocolate (bit like a Crunch bar)

Boost– crushed energy-infused biscuit encased in caramel and (guess what?) covered in chocolate

Star Bar– same thing as a Boost but with peanuts inside as well

Cadbury Creme Egg– only available from December to around two weeks after Easter,consists of a yellow/white cream filling in a chocolate shell. This I’ve actually seen many times in grocery stores here.

Mars Bar– nougat and caramel in chocolate (what else?), so like a Milky Way almost.

Nestle
Even though Nestle sells chocolate here in the US, it also makes two of my favourite British candies

Smarties– are not sold here due to their unfortunate similarity to M&Ms. They come is brighter colours and the shells tastes different, better in my opinion.
Photo: fritish

Aero– similar to Wispa, but with bigger air bubbles

You know how Dove tends to market itself as finer, richer, and smoother than Hershey’s? Galaxy is like that. Galaxy chocolate is the smoothest, creamiest chocolate you’ll find outside of Switzerland or Belgium. Galaxy makes Minstrels, which are like large M&Ms but with a different tasting shell Hershey’s Drops are an imitation.

Terry’s Chocolate– known primarily for the Chocolate Orange Ball, which is segments of orange-flavoured chocolate, a Christmastime favourite.

Maltesers– malt honeycomb balls dipped in chocolate, somewhat similar to Whoppers.

To be fair, I feel I ought to mention some non-chocolate British sweets.

Jelly Babies– gummies shaped like what somewhat look like Teletubbies. However, Jelly babies are much softer and squishier and less chewy-stick-to-your-teeth like American gummies tend to be, with the insides being just a step off from liquid.

Wine Gums– these are chewy like American gummies. Different shapes correspond with different wines (Cabernet,Claret, Port, Sherry, Brandy, Burgundy, Gin, Cider, Cognac, and Rum). Please note: wine gums do not actually contain any alcohol. Though it was very fun convincing my cousin that you could become drunk from eating them.
photo: Destiny’s Agent

Jammie Dodgers– simply a shortbread biscuit sandwiched around some strawberry jam. Great for tea time

If it explains anything, last year Brits spent £3.4 million on chocolate.


It’s Just Not the Same…

I’m going to be honest, the fact that State College has a Wegmans did actually play a part (okay a tiny one) in solidifying my decision to come to Penn State. Why? Because of this:

The international food aisle, where I can settle my fix for British candy. Regardless of the fact I come from a town with an M&M factory and the next town over is Hershey, PA (Chocolate Town USA), I find American chocolate severely lacking when compared to the glory of Cadbury and other British “sweets”. My English family knows to bring a care package of sweets for me whenever they visit, which I hoard for as long as possible. For there are only a few places stateside that sell my favourite British chocolates, Wegmans being one of them.

A BBC News article actually explains why American and British chocolates taste so unalike. The difference lies in the percentage of cocoa solids. A Hershey bar only contains 10% cocoa solids, whereas a Cadbury contains 23%. They also differ in the type of powdered milk used, and Hershey chocolate tends to have more sugar and an added ingredient, PGPR, that can replace the expensive cocoa butter.

While I actually advocate that nipping over to the local shop and trying each candy bar that tickles your fancy as the only sure way to really know what each one is like, here is a quick descriptive guide to the myriad of British sweets. Some are quite like American candy bars in principle, but others require more explanation.

Cadbury– I’ll start with a basic one that is actually quite available here in the US ( so if this post makes you hungry, you’re in luck). Cadbury’s is the largest chocolate company in England and specializes in dairy milk. No matter what the singing cows at Hershey Chocolate World say, Cadbury’s actually lives up to it’s “dairy milk” title- it’s wonderfully creamy (To those of you who don’t live close enough to Hershey to have the entire chocolate factory tour ride memorized, I apologise). The basic chocolate bar also has versions with fruits and nuts, oreos, turkish delight, toffee, caramel, and pretzels.

In addition, Cadbury also makes other chocolate bars:

Wispa– velvety milk chocolate with tiny dense air bubbles (my absolute favourite!)

Time-Out – basically like a Kit-Kat, but you, know, with better chocolate

Flake– crumbled “flakes” of milk chocolate held together by some magical way. We stick a Flake in our vanilla ice cream cones and call it a Flake 99, which you can get from any ice cream vendor.

Twirl– basically a flake, but then dipped and covered in chocolate (you’ll find the British do a lot of coating things in chocolate, for example….)

Chomp– a piece of chewy caramel, covered in chocolate

Fudge– a finger of fudge…..covered in chocolate

Curly Wurly– same thing as a Chomp, but with air bubbles

Crunchie– honeycomb ….wrapped in chocolate –>

Picnic– biscuits, raisins, caramel, nuts, puffed rice and nougat….covered in chocolate

Double Decker– layers of crispy cereal and nougatine, covered in chocolate (bit like a Crunch bar)

Boost– crushed energy-infused biscuit encased in caramel and (guess what?) covered in chocolate

Star Bar– same thing as a Boost but with peanuts inside as well

Cadbury Creme Egg– only available from December to around two weeks after Easter,consists of a yellow/white cream filling in a chocolate shell. This I’ve actually seen many times in grocery stores here.

Mars Bar– nougat and caramel in chocolate (what else?), so like a Milky Way almost.

Nestle
Even though Nestle sells chocolate here in the US, it also makes two of my favourite British candies

Smarties– are not sold here due to their unfortunate similarity to M&Ms. They come is brighter colours and the shells tastes different, better in my opinion.
Photo: fritish

Aero– similar to Wispa, but with bigger air bubbles

You know how Dove tends to market itself as finer, richer, and smoother than Hershey’s? Galaxy is like that. Galaxy chocolate is the smoothest, creamiest chocolate you’ll find outside of Switzerland or Belgium. Galaxy makes Minstrels, which are like large M&Ms but with a different tasting shell Hershey’s Drops are an imitation.

Terry’s Chocolate– known primarily for the Chocolate Orange Ball, which is segments of orange-flavoured chocolate, a Christmastime favourite.

Maltesers– malt honeycomb balls dipped in chocolate, somewhat similar to Whoppers.

To be fair, I feel I ought to mention some non-chocolate British sweets.

Jelly Babies– gummies shaped like what somewhat look like Teletubbies. However, Jelly babies are much softer and squishier and less chewy-stick-to-your-teeth like American gummies tend to be, with the insides being just a step off from liquid.

Wine Gums– these are chewy like American gummies. Different shapes correspond with different wines (Cabernet,Claret, Port, Sherry, Brandy, Burgundy, Gin, Cider, Cognac, and Rum). Please note: wine gums do not actually contain any alcohol. Though it was very fun convincing my cousin that you could become drunk from eating them.
photo: Destiny’s Agent

Jammie Dodgers– simply a shortbread biscuit sandwiched around some strawberry jam. Great for tea time

If it explains anything, last year Brits spent £3.4 million on chocolate.


It’s Just Not the Same…

I’m going to be honest, the fact that State College has a Wegmans did actually play a part (okay a tiny one) in solidifying my decision to come to Penn State. Why? Because of this:

The international food aisle, where I can settle my fix for British candy. Regardless of the fact I come from a town with an M&M factory and the next town over is Hershey, PA (Chocolate Town USA), I find American chocolate severely lacking when compared to the glory of Cadbury and other British “sweets”. My English family knows to bring a care package of sweets for me whenever they visit, which I hoard for as long as possible. For there are only a few places stateside that sell my favourite British chocolates, Wegmans being one of them.

A BBC News article actually explains why American and British chocolates taste so unalike. The difference lies in the percentage of cocoa solids. A Hershey bar only contains 10% cocoa solids, whereas a Cadbury contains 23%. They also differ in the type of powdered milk used, and Hershey chocolate tends to have more sugar and an added ingredient, PGPR, that can replace the expensive cocoa butter.

While I actually advocate that nipping over to the local shop and trying each candy bar that tickles your fancy as the only sure way to really know what each one is like, here is a quick descriptive guide to the myriad of British sweets. Some are quite like American candy bars in principle, but others require more explanation.

Cadbury– I’ll start with a basic one that is actually quite available here in the US ( so if this post makes you hungry, you’re in luck). Cadbury’s is the largest chocolate company in England and specializes in dairy milk. No matter what the singing cows at Hershey Chocolate World say, Cadbury’s actually lives up to it’s “dairy milk” title- it’s wonderfully creamy (To those of you who don’t live close enough to Hershey to have the entire chocolate factory tour ride memorized, I apologise). The basic chocolate bar also has versions with fruits and nuts, oreos, turkish delight, toffee, caramel, and pretzels.

In addition, Cadbury also makes other chocolate bars:

Wispa– velvety milk chocolate with tiny dense air bubbles (my absolute favourite!)

Time-Out – basically like a Kit-Kat, but you, know, with better chocolate

Flake– crumbled “flakes” of milk chocolate held together by some magical way. We stick a Flake in our vanilla ice cream cones and call it a Flake 99, which you can get from any ice cream vendor.

Twirl– basically a flake, but then dipped and covered in chocolate (you’ll find the British do a lot of coating things in chocolate, for example….)

Chomp– a piece of chewy caramel, covered in chocolate

Fudge– a finger of fudge…..covered in chocolate

Curly Wurly– same thing as a Chomp, but with air bubbles

Crunchie– honeycomb ….wrapped in chocolate –>

Picnic– biscuits, raisins, caramel, nuts, puffed rice and nougat….covered in chocolate

Double Decker– layers of crispy cereal and nougatine, covered in chocolate (bit like a Crunch bar)

Boost– crushed energy-infused biscuit encased in caramel and (guess what?) covered in chocolate

Star Bar– same thing as a Boost but with peanuts inside as well

Cadbury Creme Egg– only available from December to around two weeks after Easter,consists of a yellow/white cream filling in a chocolate shell. This I’ve actually seen many times in grocery stores here.

Mars Bar– nougat and caramel in chocolate (what else?), so like a Milky Way almost.

Nestle
Even though Nestle sells chocolate here in the US, it also makes two of my favourite British candies

Smarties– are not sold here due to their unfortunate similarity to M&Ms. They come is brighter colours and the shells tastes different, better in my opinion.
Photo: fritish

Aero– similar to Wispa, but with bigger air bubbles

You know how Dove tends to market itself as finer, richer, and smoother than Hershey’s? Galaxy is like that. Galaxy chocolate is the smoothest, creamiest chocolate you’ll find outside of Switzerland or Belgium. Galaxy makes Minstrels, which are like large M&Ms but with a different tasting shell Hershey’s Drops are an imitation.

Terry’s Chocolate– known primarily for the Chocolate Orange Ball, which is segments of orange-flavoured chocolate, a Christmastime favourite.

Maltesers– malt honeycomb balls dipped in chocolate, somewhat similar to Whoppers.

To be fair, I feel I ought to mention some non-chocolate British sweets.

Jelly Babies– gummies shaped like what somewhat look like Teletubbies. However, Jelly babies are much softer and squishier and less chewy-stick-to-your-teeth like American gummies tend to be, with the insides being just a step off from liquid.

Wine Gums– these are chewy like American gummies. Different shapes correspond with different wines (Cabernet,Claret, Port, Sherry, Brandy, Burgundy, Gin, Cider, Cognac, and Rum). Please note: wine gums do not actually contain any alcohol. Though it was very fun convincing my cousin that you could become drunk from eating them.
photo: Destiny’s Agent

Jammie Dodgers– simply a shortbread biscuit sandwiched around some strawberry jam. Great for tea time

If it explains anything, last year Brits spent £3.4 million on chocolate.


Watch the video: Ψυχολογικό τεστ: Μπορείτε να μαντέψετε ποια δεν είναι αληθινή οικογένεια; (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Innis

    I have forgotten to remind you.

  2. Ferehar

    Authoritative post :)

  3. Libby

    Christmas trees, stupid article



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